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Home > Resource Conservation > Heat  > Small Area Heat/Cool > Heating

Resource Conservation: Heat: Small Area Heat/Cool: Heating

That's Hot
Heating can be the biggest part of your winter energy bill. Since there are so many sources of energy to heat with we will try to cover as many as we can. We look at heating areas up to 2,000 sq feet and mostly portable methods.

 

Passive Fan Wood Fire Pellet Heat Pump Infrared Gas Videos

Passive Cooling:

General Comments:

breeze at nightPassive cooling takes advantage of how heat flows naturally. A rock, for instance, will warm up when the sun shines on it. At night, that rock will release heat into the cooler night air.
     Passive cooling is not a new concept, however these days, many seek to incorporate features of this type of cooling where they live. Passive cooling can be done many ways and can keep your cooling bill way down. As a matter of fact, if your home (business) is designed for this you may not have a bill for cooling.

Some passive cooling techniques can be:
  • Close curtains: Closing curtains (particularly south facing windows) can help shut out the suns warming effect.
     
  • Shade: Shading south facing windows with an awning or by planting a tree, can save a ton off of your cooling bill.
     
  • Reflective Coatings: Most reflective coatings are white and are painted on roofs and exterior walls. They are designed to reflect the suns rays. May not be that cost effective.
     
  • Low or Undergrade Air Chamber: A method of bringing cool outside air into the bottom of your house and letting it vent out the top.
     
  • Radiative Cooling: Takes advantage of bulky items storing heat. Insolated by day, radiative at night.
     
  • More: There are more ways to passively cool but we will not go into all of them here.

Energy Efficient:

The use of these techniques are highly energy efficient. Why? They are passive, of course. However, the efficiency calculation has to begin with the cost of implementing your passive system.
     Some of these ideas will save a lot of energy and some will save a little. This will also depend on the size of your home (business) and how hot it gets. The first thing to ask yourself is, can you bear the cost of cooling your home with the methods you currently employ.
     Curtains: we do not have a good estimate of savings but may be 2% to 5% savings. You would also need curtains.
     Shade: An awning may cost a bit and may detract from the look of your house. A tree may look better but be careful that it does not grow too tall. May save 5% to 10% of energy costs
Reflective Coatings: In general, the saddle point for this being a cost effective way to reduce heating bill is for buildings below the 40th parallel. Some coatings have been reported to reflect 85% of the suns rays.
     Low or undergrade air chamber: Usually this depends on having a hole cut into your house at a low level (shaded side). Another hole cut into the floor to allow the air to pass. Also, a hole at the top of the house to let the air out. This can make a big difference on your energy bill (perhaps 50% to 70% savings).
     Radiative Cooling: Can pretty much replace cooling system but some of these techniques need to be designed into the house when built. Some possible ways to do it after the home is built and can save a lot of money (on energy). However, initial costs could be in the $10's of thousands. You may be able to achieve return on investment in 5-10 years.

Installation:

There is quite a range of projects here. Some are do-it-yourself and some you may need a contractor. The best thing to do is to start free and small. As you save your money, you can do the bigger things.  To find a contractor in your area you may want to look them up on Angie's List.

Disposal:

Awnings and chunks of your house that you cut away may be able to be recycled. You need to check with your recycler or the charity that you possibly give the materials to.
     The roof coating is water based acrylic. After application, it washes off the application tools with soapy water. The MSDS accounts for about 35% of the contents being Calcium Carbonate (bicarbonate), Titanium Oxide, and Quartz. About 1-3% of this is VOC (Volatile Organic Compounds) which are emitted during curing. California residences check for Proposition 65 compliance.
The roof coating contains no RCRA materials so it is non hazardous and can be disposed of in the land fill.
      Some of the other materials that could be used in this section are too numerous for us to try to track. However, you may want to follow one of the links below to answer your questions.

Our Picks:

We found some products that may help you with your passive cooling needs. You can find them at our Amazon.com store. There may be some tax breaks and rebates for some of your passive cooling activities.

 

Fan:

General Comments:

fan picsA fan is a very simple way to move air around. However, there are many things on the market that make moving air really cheap or really expensive (thanks Dyson). One can get a fan for as little as $10 or as much as $400, we will talk about that later.
     A fan can help move air around, which is helpful if you are in the path of that moving air on a hot day. The fan does not make the air cooler but it does help the sweat evaporate off of your body. This has a cooling effect for your body.  For heating it can move warm air around your house.
Fans can be very loud and very quiet. However, most on their lowest setting will be very quiet. When you are in the path of a fan on a high setting (with blades) you may get the buffeting feeling. The Dyson will not do that at any setting.
    You can use a fan by itself or with one or more of the other methods talked about here. Doing this may increase the effectiveness of the other method without a lot of power consumption.

Energy Efficient:

The efficiency of a fan is going to depend on how you use them. Many fans will be somewhere between 10 and 50 watts. If you are moving cool/warm air from area generated to area needed then that could be an efficient use of the fan. 25 watts may be a small price to pay to get your bedroom cooled down (warmed up) if the cooling/warming device is in the living room.
    A good fan will move a lot of air and a poor one will not. Most fans that you will buy will move about the same amount of air for a given power (except one).
The Dyson company has created something called the Dyson Air Multiplier (fan). This is not a simple fan and as the name implies, it can move a lot of air. How much? In the literature we have read as much as 15 times. This makes the device highly effective when moving a lot of air.  
     Just because the fan moves 15 times the air that it receives at the input of the fan does not mean it is 15 times more efficient at moving air as a normal fan. From the reviews we have seen, however, the efficiency is approximately the same as a regular fan (air moved/watt).

Installation:

What can we say about installation? A portable fan is something you plug in and start. However, some fans are the big permanent ceiling fans. A ceiling fan may be a do-it-yourself project but we suggest you consult the services of an electrician before you take on a project like that. To find a contractor in your area you may want to look them up on Angie's List.

Disposal:

Fans can be made out of a bunch of things. The motors are generally a lot of recyclable metal and the power cords as well. Some, with remote controls will have a circuit board to receive the signals and control settings.
     Some may have a separate oscillating motor with metal in it. The rest of the parts could be a number of other materials.
     Fan blades could be wood, metal, plastic, or even rubber. Metal and wood would tend to be the most recyclable but you would have to check. The other materials are generally not.
     If the fan has a cage around it the possible materials are metal or plastic. The metal would tend to be scrap aluminum but could be another metal.
The stand or base could be metal or plastic. metal can be recycled but the plastic would generally not be.
     There will usually be a difference between cheap fans and expensive fans as far as the types of plastic used. The cheap fans will have cheap plastic and tend not to be recyclable.
     The Dyson fan is made from a sturdy thermoplastic and is not cheap. We looked all over their site but could not find a "buy back" program for their products at the end of their life.

Our Picks:

There is a company out there that are experts with portable heat/cool systems. They are Air & Water Inc. They have a big selection of portable heat/cool units.   We can not recommend, at this time, the Dyson fan product because from the mixed reviews we have found. We are not convinced that one would gain enough efficiency advantage to get a reasonable return on investment.

Shop Air-n-Water.com!

Greencompletely.com is an affiate of Air & Water, Inc.

Wood Fire:

General Comments:

fireplace picThe fire place has been around for many centuries. The wood stove is a more recent invention (kinda). We will talk about both in this section because of the similarities. They both generate about the same amount of waste and they both rely on the burning of wood as a heat source. They both need a lot of wood for a winter season, however, the wood stove may need a little less.
     Since an wood stove only lets air travel through a small path into the fire and out of the fire these fires tend to burn a little hotter than wood in a fire place.
     Another advantage of fire places and wood stoves is that there is no other heating method that does not need electricity to work. If you are in an area prone to black outs or it is not feasible to get electricity to the building, a wood stove may be the answer.
Wood stoves and fire places will generate a larger amount of personal waste than many of the other heating methods. From an efficiency stand point there are more efficient choices.
     However, the fire is fun to look at and many people get a cozy feeling all curled up next to the fire.
     Looking at costs may put an advantage on wood stove or fire place. The initial cost may be a little smaller than installing other stationary units. However, the fuel (firewood) is a little different. If you live in a heavily wooded area the fuel costs may be somewhat low. In a city away from the woods, the costs sky rocket.

Energy Efficient:

 The wood stove is a little more efficient than a fireplace.  They burn hotter and unlike fireplaces, a large part of the heat does not go up the chimney. The fire place tends to have a 40% to 60% combustion efficiency were the wood stove is more like 65% to 75%.
      There is between 8,000 and 9,000 BTU of energy per pound for dry seasoned firewood. That means, the fire place will release between 3,000 and 5,000 BTU's per pound. The wood stove will release more like 5,000 to 6,500 BTU's per pound from the wood. Once released, a fireplace will let a lot of that heat go up the chimney. The wood stove will radiate more of that heat into the room.  
     Comparing wood burning to other methods shows that this may not be the best choice of heating for efficiency. 
Also, there is a certain efficiency of collection. The trees have to be cut down, sawed up, hauled out of the woods, split, stacked and placed on a truck before it comes to your door. That is a good amount of gas and human energy used for each cord of wood.
       Depending on where you live, there may be burn bans at some very cold times of the year, so you will need to have a back up to this method.

Time Efficiency: This is tough to calculate. You will use 4-10 man hours per cord to gather it yourself. When it is delivered to your door. You may need an hour to stack each cord. You will spend about an hour or more taking loads into the house per cord. Cleaning ash may be another 1/2 hour per cord. Compare that to the amount of time you need to run another method.

Installation:

Usually you can't just build a fireplace any way you want. There are regulations and usually a fireplace or chimney is built with the house.  We are not experts of that here, but we suggest you look up the services of a contractor that does that kind of thing. The wood stove would also need a chimney and an area to have the stove. To find a contractor in your area you may want to look them up on Angie's List.

Disposal:

What a mess. If you deal with either of these methods you will have a mess on your hands. Since the burning efficiency is better for the wood stove you may have less to clean up than for the fire place. Since there are many types of waste for this method of heating we will look at them separately.
   Before You Buy Waste: Before that cord of wood is delivered to your door  the tree needs to be cut down, de-branched, skidded to the tower, cut up, transported, split, transported to your house. That can be as much as 10 gallons of gas, 1-2 pints of bar oil burnt for each cord sent to your house.
     Waste In Air: The fire place will generate more waste in the air in general. The waste is in the form of fly ash, smoke and gasses. Since the wood stove tends to burn a little hotter, there should be less fly ash and smoke, therefore less creosote will build up on the interior of the chimney.
      The gas waste is a combination of water vapor, CO, CO2, NOx, SO2 and maybe a few other things if you are not picky about what you burn. You produce about 1,000 pounds of this combination of gases for every ton of wood you burn.
Continual Solid Waste: Ash and coals. As you burn wood, ash will be left behind in the fire place (wood stove). For each ton of wood you may be digging as much as 500 pounds of ash out of your stove. Sometimes fireplace ash is used as a fertilizer (but for special planting).  Else, the ash goes into the trash. Every once in a while, the creosote build up in the chimney needs to be swept out. This material is toxic and has few uses (gets thrown away).
     Loose bark, broken axe handles and metal filings may also be a solid waste of this form of heating. Also, bringing in the wood may also bring in bugs that may damage your house in various ways.
     End of Life Solid Waste: A wood stove contains a lot of metal. There may be some worn areas but for the most part can be recycled. A grate of a fire place could also possibly be salvaged. However, the chimney will be a few tons of brick and mortar soaked in creosote. Even though, brick and concrete are becoming much more recyclable, the creosote covered material may just have to go to the land fill.

Our Picks:

Fire Place:  All we can say about this is you need to find a good contractor locally, perhaps a brick layer to install a fire place. They should know how to make this project to the code of your locale. To find a contractor in your area you may want to look them up on Angie's List. Wood Stove: We found a few good wood stoves on Amazon.com and you are welcome to buy them from our store. However, the best way may be to find it locally and have someone install it locally. This way you are sure everything is to code.

 

Pellet Stove:

General Comments:

pellet stoveThe pellet stove is another device that burns wood. However, it does this in a very different way. This is the "clean coal" of the wood burning industry. The wood burnt in these stoves is basically sawdust formed into a pellet. Because of that, there is more surface area exposed to the flames for an efficient burn.
     The burning of pellets is very different. Pellets are stored in a bin in the system. Two fans direct one flow of air through the burn pot and up the chimney while the other flow comes from the room, through the heated area and back into the room. The 1" pellets are fed from the storage to the burn pot on an auger. Only a dozen or so pellets are in the burn pot at one time. Air passes from the outside of the burn pot to the inside creating a vortex. This insures that air is always flowing through the burning volume. When the pellet is burnt, bits of ash fly out of the pot and are collected on the ash tray.
That is it. Very simple to operate. Haul in 40 to 80 pounds of pellets and the stove does the rest. No bugs, twigs or bark to deal with. You do not have to split kindling, the pellets will burn without a smaller fuel.
     The fuel pellet can be made from sawdust but could also be made out of junk mail, grass, corn, wheat and even yard waste. Hard wood pellets are generally the best to use but we will discuss that a little later.
     Usually, if there is a burning ban in your area, it applies to fire places and wood stoves. Pellet stoves are exempt because of the ultra small amount of particulates they send into the air.
     In general, you do not have to spend a bunch of time tending the fire. You set the pellet feed rate and a thermostat and pellets start to feed. You will want it continuously on until you do not want to heat the space anymore. We recommend that you do not have the unit running when not at home (but it can).  Find rebates.

Energy Efficient:

Compared to fire place and wood stove, the pellet stove wins hands down with a combustion efficiency of 78% to 85%. This means that the fire burns almost everything and leaves a fine light ash behind.
     Since there is a channel of air that comes through the stove, it more actively heats the room. Therefore, much more of the heat generated comes into the room.
     Since there is 8,000 to 10,000 btu/lb of heat energy in wood pellets (about the same as cord wood), you are claiming 6,000 to 8,000 btu for each pound you burn. Usually a stove can be set to burn 1 to 5 pounds an hour, so it can put out a lot of heat.
      During operation the fans will use 100 to 500 watts of power, so overall the unit can deliver about 35,000 btu/hr into your house using about 1/2 a kilowatt hour of power (max).
What about costs? Pellets will cost between $0.07 to $0.18 a pound. If your utility charges $0.10 kWhr then you will spend $0.08 to $0.19 an hour for each pound you feed into your stove. Some of the more expensive pellets will allow you to run the stove at a lower feed rate but in general you will probably not spend more than $0.25/hr heating your home (business).
    You may be able to save some money making your own pellets or having them shipped to you in bulk. Follow this page to see our write up about making or buying.

The federal and local government may have some rebates or tax breaks for installing a pellet stove. Go here to look for some.

Installation:

We recommend you find a qualified installer of these types of stoves. If you are doing this yourself, follow the provided set up instructions carefully. To find a contractor in your area you may want to look them up on Angie's List.

Disposal:

Compared to a fire place and wood stove, this method saves a bunch of waste.
piles of pellet bagsWaste To Your Home: Sawdust is a waste byproduct of mills. Therefore, it cleans up some waste that would actually be thrown away. However, it creates a little. It takes energy to press the pellets. Then if you are buying the material by the bag, the pellets are shipped in stacks on pallets,  wrapped in shrink wrap, with a massive plastic cover. Those pallets are shipped on a truck to get them to your local supplier. That means each ton creates about 20 pounds of plastic, one pallet and several gallons of diesel waste. To avoid this waste you may want to make the pellets or have them delivered in bulk. See this page to find out how.
     Waste In Air: Practically no smoke comes out of the chimney when a pellet stove is operating. However, that does not mean there is nothing coming out. Burning will send off all of the typical gases, but since the burn is so hot, many of the bad gasses are very low concentration. The pellets have very low moisture so there will be little water vapor. CO2 will be present and you will put out about 1500 pounds for every ton burnt. The others stuff (NOx, SO2, CO) will be in small concentrations. Burring non-wood fuels may create a higher amount of these gasses.
     Premium wood pellets will produce less than 0.01% Sulfur where as other pellet material may create up to 0.5%.
Continual Solid Waste: If you get pellets in a plastic bag, the bag will be a waste (another 20 pounds per ton). However, the rest is manageable. You will have 10-20 pounds of fly ash to clean out of your stove per ton of premium wood pellet. Premium wood pellets are rated at about 0.5% fly ash waste. Other materials made into pellets (junk mail, corn, wheat, etc) will have between 1-11% fly ash.
     There will not be much creosote (if any) build up on the walls of your chimney. This is because, during the burning process, almost all of the wood is exposed to the flame and burns completely. Creosote tends to come from light particles created from an incomplete burn.
     No need for an ax, wadded paper, kindling, fire pokers or shovels.
     End Of Life Waste: The stove is mostly metal. There should be a couple of fans with recyclable parts as well (if you can get them out). A few logic circuits and sensors.
     The brick and mortar of the chimney should have no or very little creosote build up even after decades of use. Therefore, the brick and cement can be recycled normally. Even if it is thrown into the land fill, it should not be bad over time.  
      If you are storing the pellets in a bin or silo, you may have another purpose for it. If you don't have another purpose, you might be able to sell it.

Our Picks:

There are several brands of pellet stove. Consumer Reports did a comparison and brands like Harman, Napoleon, Continental and Lopi where at the top of their lists. The criteria for their scoring was based on capacity, loading, cleaning and controls. It did not seem like there was a straight forward comparison of efficiency and emissions between the brands.
     The only place we found an emissions comparison was on the show room floor of a Quadra-Fire dealer. This display was supposedly taken from an EPA study. We have not been able to confirm that. The problem is that the manufacturers have their own testing and they won't necessarily match from manufacturer to manufacturer.
Below are some very good pellet stoves we found at Amazon.com (for you do-it-yourselfers). We recommend you look locally for a pellet stove supplier if you plan to have an expert install the stove.
     Remember, there may still be rebates or tax breaks to install this type of heating into your home (or business).

To find a contractor in your area you may want to look them up on Angie's List.

Pellet stoves will be in the range of $1,500 to $4,000. If you buy from below, make sure you buy everything you need to install the stove. Go to our Amazon.com store.

 

Heat Pump:

General Comments:

heat pump picHeat pumps have such a simple name. Yes, they pump heat from place to place and can be used to cool or warm your home. If you want your home (business) cool you "pump" the heat to the outside. Likewise, if you want your building warm you pump heat in from the outside.
     That makes heat pumps a very versatile selection for your heating/cooling needs. Mostly thought of being a part of central air conditioning, these units are also portable (set on a window or hole in the wall).
In the summer, they operate as a normal air conditioner and in the winter it is the reverse (like you are cooling the outside of your home). There is a compressor filled with refrigerant that is at the heart of the system.
     One disadvantage is they have an outside temperature range. This is reached somewhere between 22F to 30F. If you where to turn your heat pump on at that point (or cooler) the unit would just continue to run because it would not be able to achieve temperature.
     Some bigger heat pumps may have a second stage to allow the operating temperature to go lower or higher. If they don't heat pump units will have aux. heat, with is a heating coil that will always work.

Energy Efficient:

People are encouraged to buy these types of units because of their efficiency. However, as described above the efficiency is seen at higher temperatures. If it is 50 deg F. outside you could be saving 50% to 60% over a conventional heater. As the outside temperature drops the efficiency gets less until you are using the conventional (electric coil) heater below 30 deg F. Also, you have just 1 heating/cooling system, not two types. The electric coil is built into the heat pump so it is all the same system. Therefore, a heat pump is best suited for places that have a temperature range between 40 deg F to 90 deg F on average.
     The cost may be on par with an air conditioner but you get more utility out of this unit. Common in hotels.

Installation:

Installation of a portable unit cold be a little complicated. Most of the time, however, you just slide the unit into the window or the hole in the wall and plug it in. If you need to make the hole you may want to consult a general contractor to help you with that task.  To find a contractor in your area you may want to look them up on Angie's List.

Disposal:

Continual waste: Since this unit operates on electricity it does not burn anything. In general replacing (or rinsing) the filters should be about the only waste from this type of unit. An air filter is usually mostly paper and can be thrown away (not recycled). The plastic type can be reused many times (just rinse).
End of life waste: A portable heat pump is 50 to 100 lbs of metal, plastic and some circuit boards. The main item you need to throw away carefully is the reservoir that contains the refrigerant.
     The metals in these units can be recycled and the compressors may be. Also, the manufacturer or an HVAC specialist may be able to take back your old unit.
Depending on the age of the unit, the refrigerant could be bad or not as bad. R-12 and R-22 were common refrigerants 30 years ago until that pesky hole in the Ozone layer was detected. These refrigerants contained CFC's that was linked to ozone destruction. Many other candidate refrigerants where use or are being developed but the main one today is R-410a (combination of R-32  and R-125).
Older units may also contain PCB's (a toxic substance banned in 1976).

Our Picks:

There is a company out there that are experts with portable heat/cool systems. They are Air & Water Inc. They have a big selection of portable heat/cool units.   They sell air conditioner/ heat pump combination units. There prices are very competitive with the rest of the industry.

 

Shop Air-n-Water.com!

Greencompletely.com is an affiate of Air & Water, Inc.

Infrared Heaters:

General Comments:

infrared scrollYou may have heard of infrared light in science class. This is light you can not see but can feel. This is the light of heat and it is used in several areas.
      Here light is used to heat our bodies and things in the room with us. Therefore, it does not heat the air, just objects. This also makes a good heater outdoors on patios and in garages. This light will not give you a sun burn (ultra violet light does that).
The indoor units tend to be save to the touch and can have a thermostat control.
      This in not your typical heater. You need to point it at something you want to heat. You can point it at your body and you will warm up. If you are moving around we suggest that you point it at something that will warm up the room.

Energy Efficient:

An infrared heater can run on electricity or propane. Either way, the unit will be a very efficient heater. The main thing is that the heater needs to be pointed at something you want to heat up (since it does not warm the air).
     Propane or natural gas. A unit operated with this fuel source does not need electricity to operate. That is great for places that have black outs or where there is no electricity. However, some units may need to be well ventilated or need to be installed permanently.
Electric units. This is also a very efficient choice. These units tend to be 400-800 Watts and equivalent electric heaters are greater than 1,2000 Watts. These units tend to be 20% to 50% more efficient then electric space heaters.

We looked for ratings at ENERGYSTAR but could not find anything about infrared heaters.

Installation:

There is not much involved to installing portable units. The gas units will require ventilation but the electrical units may require just a small air path around them.
      The permanent gas units will require more and you should consult a contractor before a unit like this is installed.
To find a contractor in your area you may want to look them up on Angie's List.

Disposal:

Some of these units have a very simple design. Mostly made from metal of various type. Some are a combination of a wood housing and some electronics to create the power feed to the infrared element. Some may also have circuit boards to deal with power settings and thermostats. Over all, these units may be made out of a lot of recyclable materials. The gas units will have continual burn byproducts. This is the burning of a hydrocarbon so the byproducts will be some CO2 as well as a few other gases.

Look for a recycler in your area.

Our Picks:

We looked for infrared heater comparisons at Consumer Reports but we could not find any. Air & Water, Inc. has several infrared heaters to choose from and we recommend you go there to find your small area heating needs.  There are many models that operate at 800 Watt that are about equivalent to 1,500 Watt space heaters.

Look for Rebates and Tax breaks in your area.

 

Shop Air-n-Water.com!

Greencompletely.com is an affiate of Air & Water, Inc.

Natural Gas and Propane Heat:

General Comments:

pics of gas heatersWe talked a little about gas in the infrared heaters section. Here we cover infrared models as well as open flame types of heaters. Portable units may need much more ventilation than some of the other methods mentioned in this section.

Energy Efficient:

Compared to many other methods of heating small spaces using gas is pretty efficient (from a cost point of view). Gas is fairly cheap, and so many people equate that with efficiency.
     One can see better efficiency of the gas arrives to the house (business) in the form of a pipe (gas line). This means that the cost to deliver to the heater is small. However, if you need to get in your pick up, drive 20 miles each way to fill a small propane tank, the efficiency of the method suffers. Even having a truck deliver to a large tank looses efficiency over a gas line to your house.
Over all a gas heater will have better than 90% conversion of the gas to heat (some cases as high as 96%). This means very little heat will be wasted. This will depend on the method of heating (heating an element, infrared, heating air).
     This all sounds great, but at these temperatures, we can't help but wonder if some parts burn out faster than with other methods.

Installation:

Portable units can just be moved into position. You will need to hook them up to the propane fuel source and start the unit.
     For the more permanent fixtures you should consult professionals who know how this type of unit is installed. Follow directions with great care.
To find a contractor in your area you may want to look them up on Angie's List.

Disposal:

Some of the infrared heaters are a very simple construct and will have many recyclable parts. Other units will still have a lot of metal but also have electronics that you will want to deal with.
     You may also need to deal with tanks and tubing that carries the gas. For some, you will have a gas main coming into your house or business. That is a lot of metal to deal with.
These heaters burn a hydrocarbon, therefore they will create CO2 and other gases during their operation.

Find a recycler in your area.

Our Picks:

We have found a great selection of gas heaters at Air & Water, Inc. They have a selection of infrared and open flame types of heaters. Their prices are competitive with others in the industry. Some products may qualify for Tax Breaks and Rebates.

 

Shop Air-n-Water.com!

Greencompletely.com is an affiate of Air & Water, Inc.

Videos:

We make videos but also realize some exist already. Have a look.

How A Dyson Air Multiplier Works:
Quadra-Fire Stove Installation (Pellet Stove):

There are many videos about pellet stoves. This one is about the installation of a Quadra-Fire.



Or go to YouTube to watch the video.

Red Core 1500 (infrared space heater):

Video about the Red Core 1500 infrared space heater.
Or you can watch it at YouTube.com.

How a Heat Pump Works:

A bit cheesy but a reasonable treatment of how heat pumps work.


Or you can watch this on YouTube.

More Videos:

As we research more, more videos will come. Some may even be done by us.

 

__________________________________________________

Green Calculator:

We would normally create a green calculator here. However, we have found a web site that helps you find your SEER calculation. Normally SEER calculations are made for more permanent HVAC systems but you can get an idea here of how powerful of a system you can choose.
Go to ACDoctor here.

Glossary Of Terms:

Passive Heating/Cooling: The act of using the natural heat flow process to warm or cool your home or business.

Reflective Coating: A coating painted on a surface to reflect the rays of the sun.

Refrigerant: A liquid used in refrigerators and air conditioners. Involved in the process of cooling air. Some are considered hazardous waste. The most current refrigerant used is R-410a.

S.E.E.R.: Seasonal Energy Efficiency Rating. Usually used for permanent HVAC systems but can be used to calculate your needs for portable devices.

Cord of Wood: An amount of wood measuring 4'x4'x8' (128 cubic feet) stacked. 
V.O.C.: Volatile Organic compounds. Compounds that are evaporated off of materials as they dry.

R.C.R.A.: Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. Materials that are classified as hazardous (or toxic). 

P.C.B.: Polychlorinated biphenyls. Classified a toxic substance in 1976.

C.F.C.: chlorofluorocarbon. A common substance used as refrigerants, propellants and solvents. 

H.V.A.C.: Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning.

Creosote: an oily liquid having a burning taste and a penetrating odor, obtained by the distillation of coal and wood tar, used mainly as a preservative for wood and as an antiseptic.

References:

http://greenliving.lovetoknow.com/Energy_Efficient_Propane_Furnace, Energy Efficient Propane, taken 4/12/12.

http://www.brighthub.com/environment/green-living/articles/64247.aspx, Brick and concrete recycling, taken 4/8/12.

"Heating, Cooling & Air",  Consumer Reports, July 2008, taken 8/5/10
http://www.consumerreports.org/cro/appliances/heating-cooling-and-air/air-conditioners/expert-advice-and-tips-on-how-to-save-money-and-energy-on-air-conditioning/overview/0706_tips-on-how-to-save-money-and-energy-on-air-condtioning_ov.htm?resultPageIndex=1&resultIndex=1&searchTerm=stay%20cool

http://www.consumerenergycenter.org/home/heating_cooling/firewood.html , "Firewood", California Energy Commission, Taken 9/17/11

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wood_fuel, This is a wikipedia reference to "Wood Fuel" taken 9/17/11.

http://www.consumerreports.org/cro/appliances/heating-cooling-and-air/pellet-and-wood-stoves/pellet-and-wood-stove-ratings/ratings-overview.htm, Consumer reports comparison of pellet stoves. 9/28/11.

http://www.energysavers.gov/your_home/space_heating_cooling/index.cfm/mytopic=12570, Wood and Pellet heating. Taken 10/13/11.

http://www.kinsmanstoves.com/pdf/pelletstoves101.pdf, Wood Pellet Stove 101, taken 10/17/11. We have a copy of the pdf here.

http://www.epa.gov/burnwise/energyefficiency.html, Consumers - Energy efficiency and wood-burnning stoves, Taken 10/29/11.

http://www.consumerreports.org/cro/appliances/heating-cooling-and-air/pellet-and-wood-stoves/pellet-and-wood-stove-ratings/ratings-overview.htm, Pellet and woodstove comparison. Taken 10/31/11.

http://www.makeyourownpellets.com/articles.html#q03 , How to make your own wood pellets, taken 11/26/11.